Unmanned Aerial Systems at Oregon State University

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Our Mission

To promote education and research through the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS).

Goals

  • Utilize UAS and its applicable technology to further research and data collection
  • Establish OSU as a leader in UAS use in safety and research
  • Partner with industry to provide economic opportunities for our students, faculty, and local business
  • Establish safe operating proceedures for UAS flight in compliance with FAA requirements

 

 

A note from the FAA:

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SECURITY SENSITIVE FLIGHT RESTRICTIONS

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has established airspace restrictions over 133 military facilities to address national security concerns about unauthorized drone operations. The specific restricted locations are detailed in a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) – UAS NOTAM FDC 7/7137, and may be viewed online via an interactive map here.

 
The Agency is using its existing authority under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) § 99.7 – Special Security Instructions – to establish these restrictions. The relief provided under § 99.7 is limited to requests from the Department of Defense and U.S. federal security and intelligence agencies based on national security interests.

 
U.S. military facilities are considered “sensitive” as they are vital to the nation’s security. The FAA and the Department of Defense have agreed to restrict drone flights up to 400 feet within the facility’s lateral boundaries. There are only a few exceptions that permit drone flights within these restrictions, and they must be coordinated with the individual facility and/or the FAA. The restrictions are effective on April 14, 2017. 


Operators who violate the airspace restrictions may be subject to enforcement action, including potential civil penalties and criminal charges. 


For more information about these restrictions, including frequently asked questions, please visit the FAA’s UAS website.
 

KEEP YOUR DRONE AWAY FROM WILDFIRES

There are lots of great places to fly your drones, but over or near a wildfire isn’t one of them. In fact, drone operators who interfere with wildfire suppression efforts are subject to civil penalties of up to $27,500 and possible criminal prosecution.

Here’s why it’s important: Aerial firefighting aircraft, such as airtankers and helicopters, fly at very low altitudes, just a couple hundred feet above the ground and in the same airspace as hobby and recreational drones. This creates the potential for a mid-air collision that could seriously injure or kill wildland firefighters in the air or on the ground. 

As a result of unlawful drone operations near fires this year, fire managers have temporarily grounded all aerial firefighting aircraft on several occasions for safety reasons. Shutting down firefighting operations could cause wildfires to become larger and can threaten lives, property, and valuable natural and cultural resources.

The bottom line is “If You Fly, We Can’t."

Please fly responsibly – keep your drone away from wildfires.

 

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